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Descendants of John OAKES

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Other Connections

updated 4-21-06 

Generation No. 1

1. John1 OAKES was born Abt. 1640 in England. He married Rachel (maiden name ?) OAKES. She was born Abt. 1681.

Notes for John OAKES:

Carl Oakes thinks "The first John" came from England to Virginia in the late 1660s or early 1670s under a head-right from the King. He lived in or near York County, on the York River and was a tobacco planter. He owned Oak Hill Plantation. He was probably the founder of the Oakes family in Virginia.

ABSTRACT OF NORFOLK COUNTY WILLS

Will of STEPHEN MARKS, Book E. f. 83, dated 18 Nov 1670, proved 15 Dec. 1670.

(my Sone Stephen Marks) .... two hundred acres of land that is bounding betweene Wm. Clements one ye one Side and Mr. Stratton on ye other Side, wch. Said land John Oakes now liveth on...

Children of John OAKES and Rachel OAKES are:

+ 2 i. John2 OAKES, born Abt. 1670 in York Co., VA; died Abt. 1730 in King William Co., VA.

3 ii. Charles OAKES, born Abt. 1680.

 

Generation No. 2

2. John2 OAKES (John1) was born Abt. 1670 in York Co., VA, and died Abt. 1730 in King William Co., VA. He married Elizabeth or Rachel (maiden name ?) OAKES.

Notes for John OAKES:

From the Library of Virginia on-line, Land Grants:

To all et:a Wheras et:a Now know ye that I the sd. Francis Nicholson Esq: & Governor et:a do with the advice & Consent of the Council of state according give & grant unto John Oakes three hund:d & Sixty acres of Land Lying & being in King William County formerly part of King & Queen County & bounded as followeth (viz) beginning at a knotty red Oake corner tree -- that devides the Land of the sd. Oakes and [Hanes] Hamrick & running South West three quarters of a point West four hund:d & nine pole to a small Hiccory marked inss of a white Oake downe & rotton thence West North West forty Six poles to a Corner red Oake thence North North East two & fourteen pole to a corner Maple, thence North East Eighty four poles to a Corner Sassafrax by the run of Bryery branch, devideing this Land from the Land of Wm. Hurt Junr. thence south East one hund:d eighty & four poles to the beginning Knotty red Oake the sd. Land being due unto the sd. John Oakes by and for the transportation of Eight persons into this Colony whose names are to be in the records mentioned under this patent. To have & to hold &c by[oilding] & paying &c. provided &c Given under my hand & ye Seale of this Colony this 28th Day of Octb: anno Dom. 1702. F.F. Nicholson

John Oakes his patent for 360 acres } Thomas [Harrisfield] Rachel Oakes

of Land in King William County } Thomas Cox David Rogors

E Jenings Sec:ry Eliz.a Joy [Harenby] Jones

John Oakes [Sarah Booth]

THE 1704 VIRGINIA QUIT RENT ROLLS, by Harold Oliver

OAKES JOHN KNGW [county] 350 [acres]

This John could have been the original immigrant.

Extract from King William County records: In 1706, "Mary Barker, John Oakes, John Yarbrough, admis.: in behalf of Thomal Smith and Flower Smith, orphans of John Smith." [Va. Hist. v24, pg390]

Children of John OAKES and Elizabeth OAKES are:

+ 4 i. William3 OAKES, born Abt. 1715 in King William Co., VA; died Abt. 1765 in King William Co., VA.

+ 5 ii. Charles OAKES, born Abt. 1713.

+ 6 iii. Thomas OAKES, born Abt. 1710 in King William Co., VA; died Bef. 1807 in VA.

 

Generation No. 3

4. William3 OAKES (John2, John1) was born Abt. 1715 in King William Co., VA, and died Abt. 1765 in King William Co., VA. He married wife (maiden name ?) OAKES Abt. 1740 in King William Co., VA.

Notes for William OAKES:

From the Library of Virginia, on-line

William Oakes & Daniel Singleton 400 Acres

George the second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith &c To all to whom these Presents shall come Greeting Know ye that for diverse good Causes and Considerations but more Especially for and in Consideeration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and Lawful Money for our use paid to our Receiver General of our revenues in this our Colony and Dominion of Virginia We have Given Granted and Confirmed and by these Presents for us our Heirs and Successors do Give Grant and Confirm unto William Oaks and Daniel Singleton one Certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing four hundred acres lying and being in the County of Orange in the Parish of Saint Mark and bounded as followeth / to wit / Beginning at two white Oaks Corner to Hugh James and Colonel Henry Willia and running Thence with the said Willis his line South ten degrees East one hundred and eighty eight poles to three white Oaks in the fork of a branch in the said line Thence South seventy Degrees East seventy two Poles to three ed Oaks by the side of a branch Thence South thirty nine Degrees East thirty six Poles to a red Oak and a white Oak on the South West side of a branch Thence South forty nine degrees East seventy eight Poles to a red Oak and white Oak neare a Marsh Thence South seventy one degrees East thirty six Poles to a white Oak and a black Oak neare a valley Thence North seventy two degrees East thirty two Poles to a white Oak Thence North eight degrees West ten Poles to a Spanish Oak and a white Oak corner to Edwarde Rowe Thence with the said Rowes line North thirty five degrees East two hundred and twenty Poles to a white Oak corner to the said Rowe on the head of Mattapony River Thence North fifty three Degrees West two hundred and ten Poles to two white Oaks and a red Oak ___ in Hugh Jones line and then with the said line South sixty degrees West one hundred and seventy eight Poles to the beginning With all Woods underwoods ___ Marshs Lowgrounds Meadows Feedings and their deer thereof also Veins Mines and Quarries as well discovered as not discovered within the bounds aforesaicdand being part of th said Quantity of four hundred Acres of Land and the Rivers Waters and Water Courses therein contained together with the Privileges of Hunting Hawking Fishing Fowling and all other Profits Commons delivered ..... & whatever to the ___ or any part thereof belonging or in any wise appurtaining To have hold Possess and Enjoy the said Tract or Parcel of Land and all other the before Granted Premises and every part thereof & therin and every of their Appurtances unto the said William Oaks and Daniel Singleton and to their heirs and Assigns forever To this only Use and behoof of them the said William Oaks and Daniel Singleton their Heirs and Assigns forever To be held of Us our Heirs and Sussessors as of our Mannor of East Greenwich in the Couinty of Kent in Free and Common (Soccage) and not in (Capiksor) by Knight Service. Yielding and paying unto us our Heirs and Successors for every fifty acres of land and as Proper honorably for a a laboror Greater Quantity than fifty acres the Quit Rent of one shilling yearly to be paid unto the ___ of Saint Michael the Arch Angel and also Cultivating and Improving the

Charles, Thomas, and William lived close to each other in Orange County for several years. Then William moved back to King William County, where he lived the rest of his life.

William and Daniel Singleton were granted 400 acres of land in 1741, in St. Mark's Parish, Orange County. His land was near the land that Charles owned because both were on Mine Run. In 1744 William sold his half, 200 acres. The records indicate that William was a "planter" and "of King William County".

More About William OAKES and wife OAKES:

Marriage: Abt. 1740, King William Co., VA

Children of William OAKES and wife OAKES are:

+ 7 i. William H.4 OAKES, born Abt. 1753 in King William Co., VA; died Jun 21, 1818 in Pittsylvania Co, VA.

+ 8 ii. Daniel OAKES, born Abt. 1757.

 

5. Charles3 OAKES (John2, John1) was born Abt. 1713. He married Sarah HALEY Bef. 1736 in Orange Co., VA.

Notes for Charles OAKES:

Charles probably moved from King William County to Orange County in the late 1720s or early 1730s. The earliest record was in a land record dated November 18, 1735.

More About Charles OAKES and Sarah HALEY:

Marriage: Bef. 1736, Orange Co., VA

Child of Charles OAKES and Sarah HALEY is:

+ 9 i. John4 OAKES, born Abt. 1735 in King William Co., VA.

 

6. Thomas3 OAKES (John2, John1) was born Abt. 1710 in King William Co., VA, and died Bef. 1807 in VA. He married Elizabeth (maiden name ?) OAKES. She was born Abt. 1716 in VA.

Children of Thomas OAKES and Elizabeth OAKES are:

10 i. Major4 OAKES, born Abt. 1739 in King William Co., VA.

Notes for Major OAKES:

Heads of Families - Orange County, 1782

Oakes, Major -- 12 Whites -- 0 Blacks

+ 11 ii. Isaac OAKES, born Abt. 1741 in King William Co., VA.

 

Generation No. 4

7. William H.4 OAKES (William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1753 in King William Co., VA, and died Jun 21, 1818 in Pittsylvania Co, VA. He married (1) Elizabeth ELLIOT Abt. 1775 in King William Co., VA. She was born Abt. 1754 in King William Co., VA. He married (2) Elizabeth ELLIOTT Abt. 1775 in King William Co., VA. She was born Abt. 1754 in King William Co., VA.

Notes for William H. OAKES:

Rootsweb tree email dibloc@aol..com

Rootsweb.com Martin Family of VA

Rootsweb.com Oakes/Brunson

According to Jane G. Oakes, William moved to Pittsylvania Co in the late 1770s or early 1780s and bought land next to Charles, 433 acres on the East Fork of Cascade Creek. He first appears on the Pittsylvania County Tax List in 1782 with a small family.

William's estate was settled by the October Court of 1819. He left a "Negro striker" in the appraisal of his personal property so he may have been a blacksmith.

Carl Oakes feels that William was the first member of the Oakes family where there is enough evidence to prove direct descendancy.

The Magazine of VA Genealogy, v.23, #1 (Feb.1985), transcribed by Marian Dodson Chiarito

These lists were taken from a typewritten copy found in the Clerk's Office, Pittsylvania County, at Chatham, Virginia. The two following affidavits found attached to the copy are self- explanatory.

I, S. H. F. Jones, do hereby certify that about the year 1930 I personally copied and had checked the names of persons who took the oath of Allegiance in 1777 as shown by manuscripts then in the Clerk's Office of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. The writing was faded and a few names could not be deciphered. Every effort was made to transcribe the names as they appeared on the manuscripts. The names of the foregoing Lists are a true and correct copy of the aforesaid manuscripts to the best of my knowledge and belief. The lists were also checked by Mr. Langhorne Jones, atty. Given under my hand and seal this 8th day of November, 1939. S. H. F. Jones (Seal)

State of Virginia Pittsylvania County, To-wit: I, E. E. Friend, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, the same being a Court of Record, do hereby certify that Mrs. S. H. F. Jones whose name is signed to the foregoing writing bearing date 8th day of November 1939, personally appeared before me in my county, Office and State aforesaid and made oath that the foregoing statements are true to the best of her knowledge and belief. Given under my hand this 8th Nov. 1939. E. E. Friend Clerk Pittsylvania Circuit Court Chatham, VA

Oaths of Allegiance - 1777 Pittsylvania County, VA copy done by Cynthia Hubbard Headen

More About William OAKES and Elizabeth ELLIOT:

Marriage: Abt. 1775, King William Co., VA

More About William OAKES and Elizabeth ELLIOTT:

Marriage: Abt. 1775, King William Co., VA

Children of William OAKES and Elizabeth ELLIOT are:

+ 12 i. Lemuel5 OAKES, born Abt. 1780 in Pittsylvania Co, VA; died Abt. 1819 in Pittsylvania Co, VA.

13 ii. Issac OAKES.

14 iii. Charles H. OAKES.

15 iv. Elliot OAKES, born Abt. 1776 in King William Co., VA; died Abt. 1817 in Guilford Co., NC. He married Sarah Ann KELLAM Dec 27, 1797 in Guilford Co., NC; born Jul 25, 1774 in Coventry Parish, Somerset, MD.

More About Elliot OAKES and Sarah KELLAM:

Marriage: Dec 27, 1797, Guilford Co., NC

16 v. Nancy OAKES.

17 vi. Mary OAKES.

18 vii. Elizabeth OAKES.

+ 19 viii. William OAKES, born Jan 07, 1780 in King William Co., VA; died Mar 24, 1844 in VA.

Children of William OAKES and Elizabeth ELLIOTT are:

+ 20 i. Elliott5 OAKES, born Abt. 1776 in King William Co., VA; died Abt. 1817 in Guilford Co., NC.

21 ii. Susannah (Salley) OAKES, born Abt. 1778; died Abt. 1817 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married Isaac POTTER Oct 19, 1796 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; born Abt. 1772.

More About Isaac POTTER and Susannah OAKES:

Marriage: Oct 19, 1796, Pittsylvania Co., VA

+ 22 iii. Isaac OAKES, born Abt. 1782; died Bef. 1834 in TN.

23 iv. Nancy OAKES, born Abt. 1785 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died Bef. 1833 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married David DICKINSON Aug 20, 1804 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

More About David DICKINSON and Nancy OAKES:

Marriage: Aug 20, 1804, Pittsylvania Co., VA

24 v. William OAKES, born Abt. 1787.

25 vi. Charles H. OAKES, born Abt. 1789 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

26 vii. Mary OAKES, born Abt. 1794 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married Richard CORUM Mar 14, 1814 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

More About Richard CORUM and Mary OAKES:

Marriage: Mar 14, 1814, Pittsylvania Co., VA

27 viii. Elizabeth "Fanny" OAKES, born Abt. 1796.

 

8. Daniel4 OAKES (William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1757. He married Catherine (maiden name ?) OAKES Abt. 1778.

More About Daniel OAKES and Catherine OAKES:

Marriage: Abt. 1778

Children of Daniel OAKES and Catherine OAKES are:

28 i. William5 OAKES, born Jan 07, 1780.

+ 29 ii. Anthony OAKES, born Jan 13, 1782.

+ 30 iii. John OAKES, born Abt. 1784.

31 iv. Margaret OAKES, born Abt. 1786.

32 v. Jesse OAKES, born Mar 31, 1788.

33 vi. Elizabeth OAKES, born Abt. 1792.

34 vii. Phoebe OAKES, born Abt. 1797.

 

9. John4 OAKES (Charles3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1735 in King William Co., VA. He married (1) Mary BURRUS. He married (2) wife (maiden name ?) OAKES Abt. 1755.

More About John OAKES and wife OAKES:

Marriage: Abt. 1755

Children of John OAKES and Mary BURRUS are:

35 i. Mary5 OAKES.

36 ii. Willha OAKES.

37 iii. Delpha OAKES.

38 iv. Nance OAKES.

39 v. Rueben OAKES.

40 vi. Thomas OAKES.

41 vii. Sarah OAKES.

42 viii. Rachel Ginkins OAKES.

+ 43 ix. Isaac OAKES, born May 13, 1760 in Louisa Co., VA; died Nov 01, 1844 in Perry Co., AL.

Child of John OAKES and wife OAKES is:

44 i. Henry5 OAKES.

 

11. Isaac4 OAKES (Thomas3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1741 in King William Co., VA. He married (1) Rachel CRANE Abt. 1765 in Caroline Co.,VA. She was born Abt. 1747 in Caroline Co.,VA. He married (2) Susannah MASON Abt. 1780 in Caroline Co., VA.

More About Isaac OAKES and Rachel CRANE:

Marriage: Abt. 1765, Caroline Co.,VA

More About Isaac OAKES and Susannah MASON:

Marriage: Abt. 1780, Caroline Co., VA

Children of Isaac OAKES and Rachel CRANE are:

45 i. Elizabeth5 OAKES, born Abt. 1768 in Louisa Co., VA.

46 ii. Jane OAKES, born Oct 07, 1770 in Louisa Co., VA.

+ 47 iii. William OAKES, born Abt. 1772 in Louisa Co., VA.

48 iv. Sarah OAKES, born Feb 17, 1775 in Goochland Co., VA.

49 v. Judith OAKES, born Feb 17, 1775 in Goochland Co., VA.

50 vi. Thomas OAKES, born Abt. 1776 in Caroline Co.,VA.

Children of Isaac OAKES and Susannah MASON are:

51 i. Nancy5 OAKES, born Abt. 1780 in King William Co., VA (poss. Goochland Co.).

52 ii. Martha OAKES, born Abt. 1782 in Goochland Co., VA.

+ 53 iii. Alexander OAKES, born Abt. 1786 in Goochland Co., VA.

54 iv. Catey OAKES, born Abt. 1788 in Goochland Co., VA.

 

Generation No. 5

12. Lemuel5 OAKES (William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1780 in Pittsylvania Co, VA, and died Abt. 1819 in Pittsylvania Co, VA. He married Elizabeth Jane (maiden name ?) OAKES. She was born Abt. 1785 in VA, and died Aft. 1860 in MO.

Notes for Lemuel OAKES:

From Jane G. Oakes:

Joel Estes was appointed the guardian of the orphans of Lemuel, as well as his brother Elliot, in June 21, 1819 Pittsylvania Co, Va court session. In a March 17, 1823 Pittsylvania Co court session, Robert A. McCuiston (sp?) was appointed guardian of Lemuel's children.

Lemuel and family appear in the 1810 Census of Guilford Co, NC.

Notes for Elizabeth Jane (maiden name ?) OAKES:

Listed in Census, Stokes Co, NC 1820; probably Guilford Co in 1830; probably in Davidson Co in 1840; in Cedar Co, MO in 1860 (age 75, born VA). Probably died before 1870. Information from Jane G. Oakes and Bob Oakes.

Children of Lemuel OAKES and Elizabeth OAKES are:

+ 55 i. Thomas Wilson6 OAKES, born Feb 12, 1815 in Guilford Co., NC; died Nov 12, 1890 in Hugo, Indian Territory, Choctaw Co., OK.

+ 56 ii. George William OAKES, born Bet. 1809 - 1811 in Guilford Co., NC; died Abt. 1865 in Cedar Co, MO.

57 iii. Polly OAKES. She married Abner GRIFFIN Jun 15, 1826 in Guilford Co., NC.

More About Abner GRIFFIN and Polly OAKES:

Marriage: Jun 15, 1826, Guilford Co., NC

58 iv. Evaline OAKES, born Sep 12, 1807 in Guilford Co., NC; died May 23, 1881 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married James Washington OAKES Sep 27, 1828 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; born Jan 10, 1800 in Guilford Co., NC; died Sep 16, 1877 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

More About James OAKES and Evaline OAKES:

Marriage: Sep 27, 1828, Pittsylvania Co., VA

59 v. Lemuel Robinson OAKES, born Sep 12, 1814 in Guilford Co., NC; died Apr 14, 1894 in Windsor, MO. He married (1) Mary GARDNER Sep 01, 1838 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; born Abt. 1816 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married (2) Mary Jane STORY Feb 1869; born Abt. 1832 in Troy Township, Athens Co., OH. He married (3) Sarah Jane RENFRO Aft. 1872; born Nov 1832.

More About Lemuel Robinson OAKES:

Burial: Benton Co., MO - Evergreen Cemetery

More About Lemuel OAKES and Mary GARDNER:

Marriage: Sep 01, 1838, Pittsylvania Co., VA

More About Lemuel OAKES and Mary STORY:

Marriage: Feb 1869

More About Lemuel OAKES and Sarah RENFRO:

Marriage: Aft. 1872

 

19. William5 OAKES (William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 07, 1780 in King William Co., VA, and died Mar 24, 1844 in VA. He married Ruth SMITH. She was born Mar 05, 1779 in Pittsylvania Co, VA.

Child of William OAKES and Ruth SMITH is:

+ 60 i. William Berle "Burl"6 OAKES, born Oct 15, 1816 in Pittsylvania Co, VA; died Aug 21, 1887 in Dunns, Mercer Co., WV.

 

20. Elliott5 OAKES (William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1776 in King William Co., VA, and died Abt. 1817 in Guilford Co., NC. He married Sarah Ann KELLAM. She was born Jul 25, 1774 in Coventry Parish, Somerset, MD.

Notes for Elliott OAKES:

Elliott appeared on the tax list, in Guilford County, in 1815 with 100 acres of land, and living next to the John P. Kellam family in Guilford County, and was noted in the 1810 Census. His estate was settled in 1819. Carl Oakes feels he died in 1817 because Sarah was granted an administratrix bond, in Guilford County on November 18, 1817, which was probably not long after he died. Joel Estes was appointed the guardian of Elliott's children in a June 1819 Pittsylvania County, Virginia court session.

Deed book #43, page 14, dated October 1, 1838. Ann, James, William, Isaac, John, Sarah and "Eliot", all heirs of "Elliot" Oakes deceased make a deed to Richard "Corum" for land for $70.00. The land is from their grandfather William Oakes deceased. 35 acres. Ann Oakes and "Elliott H. Oakes" signed the deed with a mark ("X") which means they could not write.

Child of Elliott OAKES and Sarah KELLAM is:

61 i. James Washington6 OAKES, born Jan 10, 1800 in Guilford Co., NC; died Sep 16, 1877 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married (1) Martha DRAIN Dec 19, 1825 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died Aug 03, 1826 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married (2) Evaline OAKES Sep 27, 1828 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; born Sep 12, 1807 in Guilford Co., NC; died May 23, 1881 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

More About James OAKES and Martha DRAIN:

Marriage: Dec 19, 1825, Pittsylvania Co., VA

More About James OAKES and Evaline OAKES:

Marriage: Sep 27, 1828, Pittsylvania Co., VA

 

22. Isaac5 OAKES (William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1782, and died Bef. 1834 in TN.

Notes for Isaac OAKES:

From Jane G. Oakes:

According to Carl Oakes Isaac married and had children but all are unknown except one son, William. Isaac survived his father but died before his mother's will was written in 1834. Her will left property to her grandson, "William, son of Isaac Oakes, deceased, of Tennessee."

Conflict: George Oakes has Isaac married to a Phoebe and Isaac dying before 1834 in Tennessee. Information done by Kay Hill, via Pat Wells, has Isaac going to Maury County, Tennessee.

Child of Isaac OAKES is:

62 i. William6 OAKES.

 

29. Anthony5 OAKES (Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 13, 1782. He married Mary "Polly" ELLIOTT Abt. 1800. She was born Apr 06, 1788.

More About Anthony OAKES and Mary ELLIOTT:

Marriage: Abt. 1800

Children of Anthony OAKES and Mary ELLIOTT are:

+ 63 i. Abigail6 OAKES, born Oct 07, 1822 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

64 ii. Martha OAKES, born Jun 21, 1818.

65 iii. Mary OAKES, born Dec 29, 1815.

66 iv. Jesse G. OAKES, born Sep 10, 1820.

+ 67 v. John Elliott OAKES, born Sep 17, 1810.

68 vi. Bathsheba OAKES, born Oct 05, 1812.

69 vii. Elizabeth OAKES, born Mar 08, 1808.

70 viii. Catherine OAKES, born Oct 11, 1814.

71 ix. Phebe OAKES, born Jan 26, 1825.

72 x. Sabrina OAKES, born Feb 25, 1827.

73 xi. Lavina OAKES, born Oct 01, 1829.

 

30. John5 OAKES (Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1784. He married Elizabeth BARDIN.

Child of John OAKES and Elizabeth BARDIN is:

+ 74 i. William6 OAKES, born Abt. 1823; died Abt. 1898.

 

43. Isaac5 OAKES (John4, Charles3, John2, John1) was born May 13, 1760 in Louisa Co., VA, and died Nov 01, 1844 in Perry Co., AL. He married Lucy WISDOM.

Children of Isaac OAKES and Lucy WISDOM are:

75 i. Jonathan6 OAKES.

76 ii. John OAKES.

77 iii. Rueben OAKES.

78 iv. Persilla OAKES.

+ 79 v. Thomas OAKES, born Apr 10, 1785 in Albemarle Co., VA.

80 vi. Nancy OAKES, born Abt. 1790.

+ 81 vii. Isaac OAKES, born Feb 21, 1797 in Oglethorphe Co., GA; died May 01, 1885 in Claiborne Parish, LA.

82 viii. Lucy OAKES, born Abt. 1802.

 

47. William5 OAKES (Isaac4, Thomas3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1772 in Louisa Co., VA. He married Alicey ADKINS Dec 10, 1797 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

More About William OAKES and Alicey ADKINS:

Marriage: Dec 10, 1797, Pittsylvania Co., VA

Children of William OAKES and Alicey ADKINS are:

83 i. William6 OAKES, Jr.

84 ii. Isaac K. OAKES.

+ 85 iii. Edward Alexander OAKES, born Abt. 1800 in Halifax Co., VA; died Abt. 1872 in Halifax Co., VA.

 

53. Alexander5 OAKES (Isaac4, Thomas3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1786 in Goochland Co., VA. He married Frances TOWLER.

Child of Alexander OAKES and Frances TOWLER is:

86 i. Frances6 OAKES.

 

Generation No. 6

55. Thomas Wilson6 OAKES (Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Feb 12, 1815 in Guilford Co., NC, and died Nov 12, 1890 in Hugo, Indian Territory, Choctaw Co., OK. He married Harriet Newell EVERIDGE Dec 05, 1839 in Kiamichi Co., Goodwater Seminary, OK. She was born Dec 10, 1824 in MS, and died Dec 04, 1906 in Hugo, Indian Territory, Choctaw Co., OK.

Notes for Thomas Wilson OAKES:

Thomas went to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma) during the time of the Indian removal (1830's). He was hired by the federal government as a carpenter to build homes, council houses, furniture, etc. There may have been a brother that came with him per Patti Pond. Conflict: Betty Oakes has a birth date of February 14, 1814 and born in Charlottesville, North Carolina. Thomas is buried in the Oakes Cemetery in Hugo, Oklahoma. From Leaders and Leading Men of the Indian Territory: "Mr. Oakes built the first house ever erected in the Choctaw Nationa nd now the properto of Thomas Ainsworth, at Oak Lodge. Unfortunately, the old gentleman has been blind for the past seven years (in 1891." From the Hisotry of Indian Territory: "Thomas W. Oakes, was a white man, born in North Carolina and his death occured in the Territory in 1893. He married Harriet Everidge, a half Choctaw, who was born in the Choctaw Nation and is now living there. She is a member of the noted Everidge family that has become so prominent in the affairs of the nation. Mr. Oakes was one of the pioneer settlers of this portion of the country, having come to the west at a very early epoch in the development of this region.

From History of Oklahoma: Tomas a native of North Carolina and cae to the Choctaw Nation shortly after the removal of the tribe from Mississippi. He was a carpenter and among his activities was the erection of the first council house of the Choctaw Nation at Tuskahoma. The building was constructed of large pine logs about 1850. He was also employed in the building of houses for chiefs, Indian agents and others during the establishment of a permanent settlement. He built the Goodwater Mission School, which was one of the earliest small schools of the Nation. A white man himself, he gained Choctaw citizenship by marriage into a prominent Choctaw family.

From Historic Spots Near Tuskahoma: The new capitol was complete in 1838 and the head carpenter, and the man directly responsible for the proper erection, was a young mand from North Carolina, Thomas Oakes. He and one of his brothers had moved west but the brother had left and gone "north". The capitol was the best of its kind and elicited praise from people in the east who came to visit. The council house was erected from pine logs felled in the neighboring forests, all hand hewn with even facings of 12 by 6 inches. Doors, windows, shutters, etc. were all hand made.

Thomas was the founder of the "Red Oakes" branch, to differentiate it from his brother's family, which were the "White Oakes" branch.

No 1880 census online for OKFrom Jane G. Oakes:

He came to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma) during the time of the Indian removal (1830s). He was hired by the federal government as a carpenter to build homes, council houses, furniture, etc. There may have been a brother that came with him [per Patti Pond] Conflict: Betty Oakes has a birth date of February 14, 1814 and born in Charlottesville, North Carolina [that location can't be right, no such place]. The cemetery listing has the same birth date. If that is right it will conflict with the birthdates of his siblings. Thomas is buried in the Oakes Cemetery in Hugo, Oklahoma. From Leaders and Leading Men of the Indian Territory: "Mr. Oakes built the first house ever erected in the Choctaw Nation and now the property of Thomas Ainsworth, at Oak Lodge. Unfortunately, the old gentleman has been blind for the past seven years (in 1891)." From Aunt Ora: Thomas Wilson went blind, however he regained his sight but told no one because it was believed to regain your sight meant death was approaching. One day my Aunt Ethel was playing nearby and when a cat tried to get some food she was eating, Thomas hit at the cat with his walking cane. That's the way the family learned he could see again.

From History of Indian Territory: "Thomas W. Oakes, was a white man, born in North Carolina and his occurred in the Territory in 1893. He married Harriet Everidge, a half Choctaw, who was born in the Choctaw Nation and is now living there. She is a member of the noted Everidge family that has become so prominent in the affairs of the nation. Mr. Oakes was one of the pioneer settlers of this portion of the country, having come to the west at a very early epoch in the development of this region."

From History of Oklahoma: Tomas a native of North Carolina and cae to the Choctaw Nation shortly after the removal of the tribe from Mississippi. He was a carpenter and among his activities was the erection of the first council house of the Choctaw Nation at Tuskahoma. The building was constructed of large pine logs about 1850. He was also employed in the building of houses for chiefs, Indian agents and others during the establishment of a permanent settlement. He built the Goodwater Mission School, which was one of the earliest small schools of the Nation. A white man himself, he gained Choctaw citizenship by marriage into a prominent Choctaw family.

From Historic Spots Near Tuskahoma: The new capitol was complete in 1838 and the head carpenter, and the man directly responsible for the proper erection, was a young mand from North Carolina, Thomas Oakes. He and one of his brothers had moved west but the brother had left and gone "north". The capitol was the best of its kind and elicited praise from people in the east who came to visit. The council house was erected from pine logs felled in the neighboring forests, all hand hewn with even facings of 12 by 6 inches. Doors, windows, shutters, etc. were all hand made.

Thomas was the founder of the "Red Oakes" branch, to differentiate it from his brother's family, which were the "White Oakes" branch.

More About Thomas Wilson OAKES:

Burial: Hugo, Indian Territory, OK - Oakes Cem.

Notes for Harriet Newell EVERIDGE:

Harriet was eight years old when she and her family came to Indian Territory, on the Choctaw Trail of Tears in 1832, a result of Andrew Jackson's removal of Indians from their Mississippi homes to make room for whites. Port Gibson is the county seat of Claiborne County, which lies along the Mississippi River between Vicksburg and Natchez. According to the story told me by my mother, Eliza Wilson Hibben, as told to her by her grandmother, Harriet Everidge Oakes, the family had been waiting and waiting for the soldiers to come help them move. Finally they came at dinner time. They gave them no time to finish the meal, so the family gathered up what they could, leaving cribs of corn and other things from their crops, and were taken to Vicksburg to get on boats to come down the Mississippi River toward the land which was to be their new nome. There were more people than there were boats to carry them so the men were "offered" (they had no choice) $10 each to walk. Harriet Oakes said their shoes wore out and they could be traced in the snow by the blood from their bleeding feet." Harriet is buried in the Oakes Cemetery near Hugo, Oklahoma.

More About Harriet Newell EVERIDGE:

Burial: Hugo, Indian Territory, OK - Oakes Cem

More About Thomas OAKES and Harriet EVERIDGE:

Marriage: Dec 05, 1839, Kiamichi Co., Goodwater Seminary, OK

Children of Thomas OAKES and Harriet EVERIDGE are:

+ 87 i. Mary Ann Hester7 OAKES, born Jan 01, 1864 in Frogville, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died Nov 12, 1931 in Paris, Lamar Co., TX.

+ 88 ii. Lem W. OAKES, born Dec 31, 1857 in Goodwater, about 18 miles SE of Hugo, Chocktaw Co. OK; died Jan 31, 1940.

+ 89 iii. Thomas Everidge/Ervin OAKES, born Dec 24, 1846 in Choctaw Nation Mississippi; died Jan 1928 in Choctaw Nation, Kiomitia Co., OK.

+ 90 iv. Joel E. OAKES, born Jan 15, 1858 in Indian Territory, OK; died Dec 07, 1937.

+ 91 v. George Washington OAKES, born Jul 1861 in Indian Territory, OK.

+ 92 vi. Charles Dosenburg OAKES, born Apr 15, 1841 in Ervin, Indian Territory, OK; died Jan 14, 1925 in Ervin, Indian Territory, OK.

93 vii. Jane OAKES, born Jan 15, 1842. She married Mr.JETER.

+ 94 viii. Samuel Lorenzo OAKES, born Dec 1853 in Indian Territory, OK.

95 ix. Mary OAKES. She married C. L. HARRIS.

96 x. Elizabeth OAKES, born Feb 1845 in Indian Territory, OK.

Notes for Elizabeth OAKES:

Elizabeth Oakes

Miss Oakes Dead

The Choctaw Herald May 1, 1913 – transcribed by Ron Henson

Miss Elizabeth Oakes, aged 68 years, died at the home of her brother, J.E. Oakes, four miles northeast of the city, last Saturday, of pneumonia, after a short illness.

Miss Oakes belonged to one of the best known native families of this section of Oklahoma, and had always made her home in Southeastern Oklahoma. She leaves five brothers, Messrs. L.W., G.W., T.E., C.D., and J.E. Oakes and two sisters, Mrs. T.D. Hibben and Mrs. Jeter.

The burial and funeral took place at the Goodwater cemetery Sunday, a large crowd of friends of the family attending.

 

56. George William6 OAKES (Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Bet. 1809 - 1811 in Guilford Co., NC, and died Abt. 1865 in Cedar Co, MO. He married Caroline S. ELLIOTT, daughter of Jonathan ELLIOTT and Lucy PARRISH. She was born Jul 1813 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

Notes for George William OAKES:

From Jane G. Oakes:

George could not write. See 9-17-1834 sales agreement.

There is a story, true or not, that says this George was called "Cripple George". He supposedly came down to Oklahoma and fathered a black child. The family showed their disgust and he went back to Missouri. Thus he became the founder of the "Black Oakes" branch. [Anne Oakes Cramer]

Further research by Bob Oakes indicated that George W. came to St. Clair County, Missouri on July 1, 1845 and he purchased 80 acres under government patent. *** From the History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri: "Filley is a post town in the southern part of Box Township, ten miles north east of Stockton. It has three stores, of which R. V. Duncan, J. S. Leonard and George W. Oakes are proprietors." *** George died after January 10, 1867 because he purchaed some land then at a Sheriff sale and before June 15, 1867 because his administrator sold some of his property to James Heams, Preston Lafayette, Nelson Eanes and Jacob Hartman.

George W. Oakes, Land Patents in Missouri:

Lafayette County, 05/01/1843

St. Clair County, 07/01/1845

Cedar County, 02/10/1852, Township 35-N, Range 26-W, Section 19, NWNE, 40 Acres

11/15/1854 Section 18, N1/2 2SW, 40.92 Acres

04/01/1856 Section 18, NWSE, 0 Acres

Section 18, S1/2 2SW, 80.96 Acres

04/01/1856, Township 35-N, Range 27-W, Section 18, NESE, 40 Acres

09/01/1856, Township 35-N, Range 26-W, Section 19, SWNE, 40 Acres

George W. Oaks, Land Patents:

Children of George OAKES and Caroline ELLIOTT are:

+ 97 i. James W.7 OAKES, born Mar 1850 in Cedar Co., MO; died Aft. 1930 in Grove, OK.

+ 98 ii. Robert Marion OAKES, born Nov 1834 in VA.

99 iii. Lucy Amanda OAKES, born Abt. 1836 in TN. She married Alfred C POWELL May 26, 1853 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About Alfred POWELL and Lucy OAKES:

Marriage: May 26, 1853, Cedar Co., MO

+ 100 iv. Thomas W. OAKES, born Abt. 1838 in TN; died Abt. 1867 in Cedar Co., MO.

101 v. Elizabeth G. OAKES, born Abt. 1842 in MO. She married Alfred C. POWELL Jan 26, 1859 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About Alfred POWELL and Elizabeth OAKES:

Marriage: Jan 26, 1859, Cedar Co., MO

102 vi. Richard OAKES, born Abt. 1844.

103 vii. Caroline Matilda OAKES, born Abt. 1848. She married Moses Lafayette PRESTON Oct 31, 1869 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About Moses PRESTON and Caroline OAKES:

Marriage: Oct 31, 1869, Cedar Co., MO

104 viii. Mary Margaret OAKES, born Abt. 1853 in MO; died Abt. 1910 in Larned, Pawnee Co., KS. She married Charles Edward BUSTER; born Jan 15, 1844 in MO.

105 ix. George W. OAKES, born Abt. 1855 in Cedar Co., MO. He married Ida (maiden name ?) OAKES; born Abt. 1870 in AR.

106 x. Harriet OAKES, born Abt. 1857 in Cedar Co., MO. She married John T. REED Oct 26, 1878 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About John REED and Harriet OAKES:

Marriage: Oct 26, 1878, Cedar Co., MO

+ 107 xi. Lemuel R. OAKES, born Jan 1861 in Cedar Co., MO.

108 xii. Sarah OAKES, born Abt. 1846. She married (1) F.M. HANER in Cedar Co., MO. She married (2) Mel DILLON in Cedar Co., MO. She married (3) John GARRISON Dec 24, 1866 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About F.M. HANER and Sarah OAKES:

Marriage: Cedar Co., MO

More About Mel DILLON and Sarah OAKES:

Marriage: Cedar Co., MO

More About John GARRISON and Sarah OAKES:

Marriage: Dec 24, 1866, Cedar Co., MO

 

60. William Berle "Burl"6 OAKES (William5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Oct 15, 1816 in Pittsylvania Co, VA, and died Aug 21, 1887 in Dunns, Mercer Co., WV. He married Abigail OAKES, daughter of Anthony OAKES and Mary ELLIOTT. She was born Oct 07, 1822 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

Child of William OAKES and Abigail OAKES is:

109 i. Mary Elizabeth Catherine "Kitty"7 OAKES, born Sep 01, 1849 in Franklin Co., VA.

 

63. Abigail6 OAKES (Anthony5, Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Oct 07, 1822 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married William Berle "Burl" OAKES, son of William OAKES and Ruth SMITH. He was born Oct 15, 1816 in Pittsylvania Co, VA, and died Aug 21, 1887 in Dunns, Mercer Co., WV.

Child is listed above under (60) William Berle "Burl" OAKES.

67. John Elliott6 OAKES (Anthony5, Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Sep 17, 1810. He married Mary E. MYERS.

Children of John OAKES and Mary MYERS are:

110 i. Sally Ann7 OAKES, born Abt. 1849.

111 ii. John OAKES, born Abt. 1850.

112 iii. Thomas OAKES, born Abt. 1852.

113 iv. William K. OAKES, born Dec 21, 1854.

+ 114 v. David N. OAKES, born Abt. 1858.

115 vi. Mary OAKES, born Abt. 1860.

116 vii. Elisha James OAKES, born Oct 1863.

 

74. William6 OAKES (John5, Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1823, and died Abt. 1898. He married Amanda NICHOLS.

Child of William OAKES and Amanda NICHOLS is:

+ 117 i. John Wesley7 OAKES, born Abt. 1858.

 

79. Thomas6 OAKES (Isaac5, John4, Charles3, John2, John1) was born Apr 10, 1785 in Albemarle Co., VA. He married Nancy WATTERS Dec 31, 1808. She was born May 19, 1790 in Oglethorphe Co., GA.

More About Thomas OAKES and Nancy WATTERS:

Marriage: Dec 31, 1808

Child of Thomas OAKES and Nancy WATTERS is:

118 i. John Collins7 OAKES, born Jan 12, 1813.

 

81. Isaac6 OAKES (Isaac5, John4, Charles3, John2, John1) was born Feb 21, 1797 in Oglethorphe Co., GA, and died May 01, 1885 in Claiborne Parish, LA. He married Amy MARTIN Oct 18, 1819 in Dallas Co., AL. She was born Oct 21, 1800 in Oglethorphe Co., GA.

More About Isaac OAKES:

Burial: Haynesville, LA - Oakes Cemetery

More About Isaac OAKES and Amy MARTIN:

Marriage: Oct 18, 1819, Dallas Co., AL

Children of Isaac OAKES and Amy MARTIN are:

119 i. Susan7 OAKES.

120 ii. Frances OAKES.

121 iii. John L. OAKES.

122 iv. Elizabeth OAKES, born Abt. 1821.

123 v. Elijah Moseley OAKES, born Dec 1822 in Perry Co., AL.

124 vi. Haney OAKES, born Abt. 1825 in Perry Co., AL.

125 vii. Washington Lafayette OAKES, born Jan 30, 1827 in Perry Co., AL.

126 viii. Ruben M. OAKES, born Abt. 1830 in Perry Co., AL.

127 ix. Isaac C. OAKES, born Abt. 1835.

128 x. Nancy Wisdom OAKES, born Jul 02, 1839.

 

85. Edward Alexander6 OAKES (William5, Isaac4, Thomas3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1800 in Halifax Co., VA, and died Abt. 1872 in Halifax Co., VA. He married Amy ADAMS Dec 22, 1823 in Halifax Co., VA.

More About Edward OAKES and Amy ADAMS:

Marriage: Dec 22, 1823, Halifax Co., VA

Children of Edward OAKES and Amy ADAMS are:

129 i. Julia D.7 OAKES.

130 ii. Richard A. OAKES, born Abt. 1827 in Halifax Co., VA.

131 iii. Thomas Drury OAKES, born Mar 30, 1829 in Halifax Co., VA.

132 iv. Sallie A. OAKES, born Abt. 1831 in Halifax Co., VA.

133 v. John Adams OAKES, born Nov 26, 1832 in Halifax Co., VA.

134 vi. Edward W. OAKES, born Jun 1834 in Halifax Co., VA.

135 vii. Benjamin Franklin OAKES, born Abt. 1836 in Halifax Co., VA.

136 viii. Christopher Columbus OAKES, born Abt. 1838 in Halifax Co., VA.

137 ix. George William OAKES, born Abt. 1840 in Halifax Co., VA.

138 x. Louisa M. OAKES, born Feb 1842 in Halifax Co., VA.

139 xi. Joannah C. OAKES, born Abt. 1846 in Halifax Co., VA.

 

Generation No. 7

87. Mary Ann Hester7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 01, 1864 in Frogville, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr., and died Nov 12, 1931 in Paris, Lamar Co., TX. She married Thomas Dixon/Dickerson HIBBEN Aug 10, 1884 in Frogville, Kiamitia, Indian Territory, son of William HIBBEN and Eliza LUSK. He was born Sep 04, 1860 in Harrison, Boone Co., AR, and died Feb 01, 1916 in Frogville, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr..

More About Mary Ann Hester OAKES:

Burial: Choctaw Co., OK - Oakes Cem

Notes for Thomas Dixon/Dickerson HIBBEN:

He was 3 years old when his mother died. He was shifted from one relative to another the most of his boyhood. Nobody wanted him or cared where he went. He was never sent to school. He was tolerated by relatives. He did nothing wrong. He was depply religious (Methodist).

In his wanderings, he came to the Indian Territory, Choctaw Nation and worked as a "snipe" on the new railroad that was being built. Later he went to work for Thomas Oakes (brother of Mary Oakes Hibben). Thomas Oakes was a county Judge of Kiamichi Co., Indian Territory, Choctaw Nation. They lived near Frogville (not very far from the house of John Hibben, Sr. b. 1771). Thomas W. Oakes was the father of Lem W., Joel E. and George Oakes.

Mary Oakes Hibben was teaching school when she fell in love with and married Thomas Dickerson Hibben. County Judge Thomas Oakes (brother to Mary Oakes Hibben) performed the ceremony. Thomas Dickerson Hibben was 23 when he married and could not write his name or read a word. Mary taught him each night, carefully and faithfully. When his children came along and were going to school, he would help them with their work. He was known to be a naturally above the average man in intelligence.

Thomas Dickerson Hibben was a Clerk of the Supreme Court of the Choctaw Nation and stayed at Tuskahoma alot of the time. After Statehood, he became one of the first County Commissioners of Choctaw Co.

Thomas Dickerson Hibben applied to become a citizen in 1902 by intermarriage of the Choctaw Nation.

The research and compilation of source documentation is th work of Benjamin Wood (a descendant).

US Census 1900 (13 June) Oklahoma, Choctaw Nation, Roll 1853 Book 1, Page 125a, lines 88-97: Thomas Hibbens (b. Sept 1860 - 34 - in AR - Occ: Farmer - Fa: NC and Mo: MS) married 16 years to Mary (b. Abt Jan 1864 - 36 - in Indian Territory - Fa: AR and Mo: Indian Territory) having 7 children born and 7 still alive. Children listed (all born in Indian Territory) are: Ethel (dau b. Aug 1885 - 14); Sophia (dau b. June 1887 - 13); S. L. (son b. Sept 1889 - 10); Eliza (dau b. March 1892 - 8); Wes (son b. March 1894 - 6); Frances (dau b. Oct 1896 - 3); and George (son b. Nov 1899 - 8/12). Also listed is Han Oakes (b. Dec 1824 - 75 - in MS - WIDOW - Fa: TN and Mo: ??) having 11 children born and 9 still alive.

T.D. Hibben

Prominent Citizens [sic] Dies

The Soper Democrat February 3, 1916 – transcribed by Ron Henson

T.D. Hibben died at his home near Frogville at an early hour Tuesday after a lingering illness. Mr. Hibben several days ago left his home for Muskogee where he was going to serve as a juror in the Federal court and took sick before leaving Hugo and was compelled to return home, where he continued to grow worse until his death.

Mr. Hibben was one of Choctaw County’s most prominent citizens, having lived here for almost half a century, marrying into one of the old families, and has spent many years as a useful citizen. When statehood was given to Oklahoma, Mr. Hibben was elected as a member of the Board of County Commissioners, which office he filled with ability until his other duties required so much of his time and he resigned his position and has since devoted his time to his fine farm southeast of Hugo.

The funeral was conducted Wednesday at his late home under the auspices of the Masons and Odd Fellows of which orders he was an honored member.

More About Thomas Dixon/Dickerson HIBBEN:

Burial: Choctaw Co., OK - Oakes Cem

More About Thomas HIBBEN and Mary OAKES:

Marriage: Aug 10, 1884, Frogville, Kiamitia, Indian Territory

Children of Mary OAKES and Thomas HIBBEN are:

140 i. Ethel8 HIBBEN, born Aug 1885 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died 1972. She married Madison Lafayette CARTER; died 1924.

141 ii. Sophia Minnie HIBBEN, born Jun 1887 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died 1957 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.. She married Charles Francis PAYNE; died 1958.

142 iii. Samuel Lorenzo HIBBEN, born Sep 13, 1889 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died Aug 04, 1958. He married Rosetta COLLINS; born Dec 09, 1893; died Aug 17, 1978.

Notes for Samuel Lorenzo HIBBEN:

Shoat Springs Cemetery, Choctaw County, Oklahoma

Hibben, Samuel L. -- Sep 13, 1889 - Aug 4, 1958; Rosetta -- Dec 9, 1893 - Aug 17, 1978

More About Samuel Lorenzo HIBBEN:

Burial: Choctaw Co., OK - Shoate Springs Cem.

More About Rosetta COLLINS:

Burial: Choctaw Co., OK - Shoate Springs Cem.

143 iv. Eliza Wilson HIBBEN, born Mar 05, 1892 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died 1972 in Paris, Lamar Co., TX. She married (1) Carol Nepoleon FRAZIER; died 1915. She married (2) George Eddie PARR.

Notes for Carol Nepoleon FRAZIER:

DOCTOR FRAZIER BURIED SATURDAY

The Hugo Daily Husonian September 5, 1915 – transcribed by Ron Henson

The funeral of C.N. Frazier, who died Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at his residence 307 East Bissel street, was held at 10:30 Saturday morning at the residence. It was in charge of the local lodge of the Woodmen of the World assisted by Reverends W.W. Armstrong and C.C. Anderson. The services wee simple and fitted with the beautiful lodge ritual. The funeral cortege then drove to the cemetery at Goodland Academy four miles west of town. There burial was performed at 1:30. The same pastors were at the grave.

Dr. C.N. Frazier was born 37 years ago last April near Tyler, Texas. The family soon moved to Fannin county where the young man grew to manhood. He received there a common school education and then went to the University of Tennessee where he graduated with his doctor’s degree in 1906. That same year, he removed to Gay, Oklahoma, where, within the next year he married Miss Roby Williams. She bore him one child, Christine, and died one year later.

This same year he moved into Hugo and later married Miss Liza Hibben, daughter of T.D. Hiben, of Frogville. To this happy marriage was born another daughter, Vivian.

In 1913 Dr. Frazier was stricken with a terrible attack of the dread small pox then raging in the city. He narrowly escaped death and it was largely due to the devoted care of his wife that he pulled through. The attack weakened him so that he never quite recovered and when he became blood poisoned some six weeks ago he was unable to rally from it. He gradually grew worse and died when the poisoning reached the peritoneal cavity.

Besides his wife and two daughters already mentioned, he is survived by one brother, John Frazier, and one sister, Mrs. R.J. Smith.

Dr. Frazier was a man of quiet manner but of strong character. He was a faithful practitioner and was and honest and upright man. He had a wide following over the entire county and enjoyed a lucrative practice. His friends, and they were legion, will miss him sorely.

+ 144 v. William Thomas HIBBEN, born Mar 11, 1894 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died Jul 20, 1973 in Hughes Co., OK.

145 vi. Frances Harriet HIBBEN, born 1896 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.. She married Randolph CARTER.

146 vii. U. K. HIBBEN, born 1898 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr..

+ 147 viii. George Wellington HIBBEN, born Nov 03, 1899 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.; died Feb 25, 1992 in Longview, TX.

148 ix. Mary Gertrude HIBBEN, born 1908 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr.. She married Charles T. WATTS.

149 x. Wes HIBBEN, born Mar 1894.

150 xi. Imogene Faye HIBBEN, born Dec 31, 1896; died Jun 1981 in Martinsburg, Berkeley Co., WV. She married Earl JOHNSON.

 

88. Lem W.7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Dec 31, 1857 in Goodwater, about 18 miles SE of Hugo, Chocktaw Co. OK, and died Jan 31, 1940. He married Lucy E. SMITH Dec 23, 1879 in AR. She was born 1852, and died 1907 in Indian Territory, OK.

Notes for Lem W. OAKES:

1900 Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory

L. W. 43 Married but no wife listed

Clarence A. 16

Fauka 14 son

Mattie 12

Nola 11

Nona 9

Indian Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma

Date: April 12, 1937

Name: Lem W. Oakes

Post Office: Hugo, Oklahoma

Date of Birth: December 31, 1857

Place of Birth: Goodwater, about 18 miles SE of Hugo, OK

Father: Thomas W. Oakes

Place of Birth: North Carolina

Mother: Harriet N. Everidge

Place of Birth: Choctaw Nation Mississippi

Thomas W. Oakes and Harriet Everidge Oakes, buried at Old Oakes family graveyard where Goodwater church and school were located.

Field Worker: Hazel D. Greene

Interview #:

Note by Field Worker

I have given this sketch just as Mr. Oakes gave it to me, in the interview this morning.

He is one eighth Choctaw Indian, the balance white blood.

OLD INDIAN DAYS

An Interview with Lem. W. Oakes, Justice of the Peace in Hugo, Oklahoma

My father's name was Thomas W. Oakes. He was a white man. His birth place was North Carolina, but he left there young and went to Mississippi, from there to come to the Indian Territory about 1837, to a place on Red River called Pine Bluff Ferry, about twenty miles from what is now Hugo.

Pine Bluff ferry was a landing place for steamboats, which came up Red River. There was a warehouse there that the people of the country had built to store goods that had been shipped by steamboat. The merchants from all over the country, some of them a hundred miles away, would come there and get the goods. People close around who had money would meet these merchants there and buy some of the goods. Or is they had anything that they could trade for them, they would do that.

Steamboats sometimes went up the river as far as Denison, Texas. Small steamboats. And sometimes they entered the mouth of Kiamichi river, and went up it as far as the Folsome gin, which was not very far from the mouth of the river.

My father was very much interested in this warehouse when he first saw it because he was a carpenter. It was built of split logs, or half logs with the ends sunken in the ground, and covered with boards that were riven by hand. Riving boards was come by cutting a piece of timber the desired length of board, then they would quarter that lengthwise and proceed to split off pieces of the desired thickness with a frog and mallett.

He met and married my mother, Harriet N. Everidge soon after they both came here. She was born in Mississippi. They settled on a farm that they cleared about four miles northeast of Frogville, but there was no Frogville then. There was a school called Goodwater. Presbyterian missionaries from up North had built it. And these missionaries tilled the soil and made their livings just like everybody else did. They swapped work with their neighbors when they would get in a tight pinch just like others. There were both men and women missionaries. The women were usually old maids, and seldom ever married out here, even though they spent their lives here as the missionaries usually did. There were several buildings at Goodwater, but in time of the war the Confederate soldiers were stationed in them and just tore them up, destroyed them, and the buildings they put up after that were never too good.

There were nine of us children, four of whom are still living. Doc Oakes lives three miles east of Hugo. George Oakes lives in Oklahoma City, and our sister, Mrs. Jeter, lives near Fort Worth with some of her children. We got to go to school about two or three months in the year. At that we walked about four miles.

We hadn't much time to go to school. We all had to work. Big, little, old and young. We had hogs, cattle and horses, chickens etc., and had these to attend to because we raised everything we had to eat and almost everything we had to wear. We raised cotton for our cotton clothes, and wool for our wool ones. Mother spun, wove and corded and made our clothes. For years we had only corn bread, of course, cooked different ways. Then we got to raising wheat and Father put in a little grist mill, kinda like a sour gum mill, countryside. Then we ground wheat and would eat the whole wheat flour. We had biscuits on Sunday morning only. Then a man put in a mill that would grind the wheat and separate the shorts etc. We'd take our wheat over there and swap it for so much first grade flour and so much shorts, or seconds, but we ate it all. None of it was wasted. This mill was located just over in Texas on the road to what is now Paris. But I remember when there was no Paris, Texas. They put oxen on an immense wheel and they kept walking to turn it and operated the mill that ground the meal and flour.

There were no post offices in this country. We had to go over in Texas to get our mail. The post office was called Texaha. Then it was changed to something else. It was in Trevis Wright's store across the river from Goodwater. Then years later a post office was established in Doaksville. I don't remember just when. We didn't pay any attention to those changes. We were too busy trying to make a living to remember when these changes took place. I don't even remember when the railroad was put through here. Father died a long time, many years, before mother did. He was 75 when he died. Mother lived to be nearly 81. She was younger than he. They are both buried at Goodwater in the Oakes graveyard.

When we were growing up there were no doctors in the country. I was half grown before I ever heard of one. Everybody those days went out in the woods and gathered roots, herbs and barks for remedies; gathered them when they were at the proper stage of maturity and hung them up in the house for winter use, just the same as to hang our meat in the smoke house. We'd kill enough meat to do us from one year to the next and I believe that that was one reason we were so healthy. We lived mostly on hog meat and corn bread and molasses. I attribute the most of the present day ills to modern food. We never heard of appendicitis. Perhaps they had it and didn't know what it was. Anyway, when one got sick, they sent for the neighbor woman and they generally knew just what herb to brew to bring about the recovery of the patient.

If people would live on things produced at home more now, they would be better off.

Men who were good prosperous farmers have quit their farms, and quit trying to make a living, and come to town to live on a little old government job. The government did nothing for us. We didn't want it to do anything for us. There is a living for every able-bodied man right in the earth, and he can have a bounteous one by digging and working for it. Too much help has ruined many good men. It is making outlaws out of them too. I've be Justice of the Peace here in Hugo continuously for 26 years, and if I live, I have two more years to serve, and am certainly in a position to know what I am talking about.

Now just the other day a 15 year old boy was brought before me for a trial for theft. He was sent to the reformatory. If they had threatened that boy as I was threatened in my younger days, I'll guarantee that he would never steal another thing. It was a finable offense to cut down or destroy a nut or fruit bearing tree or bush or vine. $5.00 for the first offense, they were tried and punished right there. A jury decided the extent of the punishment. We had no jails, no courthouse, or reformatories. We needed none. One could pay the fine in cash if they had it, for the first offense, if they chose. After that they were sentenced to be lashed from 39 to a hundred lashes on the bare back. They would cut to the blood. They culprit would faint. He would be revived with water and lashed till the sentence was carried out. I saw one lad get a hundred lashes on his bare back. He fainted again and again, but he was revived each time and the whipping continued. He was guilty of stealing a horse. He was never apprehended again for any sort of thing. The lashing made a good citizen of him. He lived to be an old and honored citizen, was a minister of the gospel for many, many years before he died just a few years ago over here at Soper. I'd rather not tell his name. He grew into such a splendid man, and it is a sore subject with his family. He never knew I was on the jury.

I was married to Miss Lucy Smith, a girl from Arkansas, December 23, 1879. She passed away this year, was buried on Easter Sunday. Seven children were born to us, all of them living in and near Hugo. She was 74 years old when she passed away.

We settled two miles east of what is now Hugo, and raised our family there. Then I sold my farm and moved to town, and have held this office of Justice of Peace ever since. I own my home, and make a garden all the time. I always keep something growing in my garden. I make enough stuff on it to feed two families. We have always canned the surplus that we have not given to our less fortunate neighbors.

In looking over my docket, I notice the names of more than fifty lawyers who have practiced in my court, who have either moved away or have passed on to that land from which no traveler returns, and where I shall soon have to go as I am living on borrowed time now. I was born December 31, 1857.

My father and mother came to this country with their respective families by ox-wagons, and a part of the way on foot. Mother said that all the young and able-bodied walked the most of the way. Just the old, sick and babies were allowed to ride.

Submitted to OKGenWeb by Deborah Spring Jiacoletti, <PMJ952@aol.com>, great, great grandaughter of Lemuel W. Oakes, March 2002.

More About Lem OAKES and Lucy SMITH:

Marriage: Dec 23, 1879, AR

Children of Lem OAKES and Lucy SMITH are:

151 i. Clarence Andrew8 OAKES, born Aug 1883 in Indian Territory. He married Harriett GIBBONS; born Mar 13, 1887 in Grant (?), Indian Territory.

Notes for Harriett GIBBONS:

Indian Pioneer History Project of Choctaw County

Harriet Gibbons-Oakes

Date: November 1, 1937

Post Office: 504 East Kirk St. Hugo, Oklahoma

Date of Birth: 1887

Place of Birth: Goodwater, about 16 miles southeast present town of Hugo

Father: Joseph Parker Gibbons

Place of Birth: South Carolina

Information on father: Father died in 1918

Mother: Mary Tolbert-Gibbons

Place of birth: Arkansas

Information on mother: Father and mother, J.P. Gibbons and Mary Gibbons, are lying side by side in the Goodland cemetery, about four miles soutwest of Hugo, Oklahoma.

Field Worker: Hazel B. Greene, Journalist

My father, Joseph Parker Gibbons, was born in South Carolina, but was raised in Arkansas. He went to common schools for a few years, then he attended the Arkansas College at Batesville, Arkansas, by working his way through. It is a Presbyterian College, and he prepared himself for the ministry. He married my mother, Mary Tolbert, about 1883, and immediately afterward the Presbyterian Synod sent him as a Missionary to the Indians at Goodwater Church in the Choctaw Nation, and in what is now Choctaw County, about 16 miles southeast of the present town of Hugo, Oklahoma. There was also a Goodwater church in McCurtain County but this is a different church. When they arrived at Goodwater, there was no parsonage so Thomas Oakes and his wife, Harriet Everidge Oakes, took them in their home. Here they lived for perhaps five or six years, maybe longer, when father built a house close by. But Solomon Hotema, a full-blood Choctaw Indian, so much wanted my father to come up to Goodland and live that he said he would give him a hundred and sixty-odd acres of land. As our house at Goodwater was small, only a couple of rooms, father tore them down and re-built, adding about three more rooms, a hall, and porches all around. This house was located about a mile from Goodland on what is now the Choctaw County Poor Farm and that house is now used as the Poor Farm home. It is still a nice house. I think that was about 1896. Father put a lot of improvements on that land, and then when Solomon Hotema died, he lost it. It seemed that Hotema had put the wrong numbers in the deed which he had given my father and when father attempted to have his deed recorded it showed only about twenty acres over in the woods about a mile away. Father didn’t want that, so Ms. Hotema and the lawyers she employed got the place that we had spent so much time and money on. When father found that he had to move, the Synod (Presbyterian) built us a home over close to the church and school. This house was to be his as long as he lived. My stepmother, Mrs. Bella Gibbons, lives in it now and it will be hers as long as she lives. Then it reverts to the church. On our move from Goodwater to Goodland school and church the team got scared ran away, and broke the wagon tongue, and father had to cut a pole and make another coupling pole and wagon tongue before we could proceed on our way. Mother lost her shooting irons and we had to go to Paris, Texas, to get more. Paris was our trading point. We even got our mail there for a long time; Father went over there about once every two or three months; he’d go one day and come back the next with a wagon load of flour, sugar and coffee all of which he bought by the barrel. Calico he bought by the bolt, also white "drilling" for making drawers for men. I cannot understand why we didn’t get mail at Goodland post office as it was in the home of Mr. Silas Bacon, only about a mile away. Of course we never got much mail of any kind, anyway, but I remember his getting it in Paris until Grant and Goodland were built on the railroad.

I recall father going to Goodland to the Masonic Lodge. I remember once when I was just about nine or ten years old the Masons for some reason had a big meeting which included business, a banquet and a dance afterward in the Lodge hall. Father went, and took me. That was one of the most wonderful experiences I ever had in my life. My world had been right at the churches where we had always lived and here I was getting to see a dance. Father attended the business meeting and then looked on at the dance for a little while. Some of the boys wanted to take me out on the floor and teach me how to dance and of course I wanted to try, but father vetoed that. However, my cup of happiness was brimming over with just getting to go to a town on a railroad and to the dance and banquet. Mother was in bad health and not able to go. The Synod transferred my father from the Goodwater church to Goodland and one thing I remember about that move was father catching turkeys out of trees to take over there with us, tame turkeys. The woods were full of wild turkeys, too.

The first years my folks lived at Goodwater my father rode an old bay horse called Old Watt. Once when he was on his way from Goodwater to Goodland to preach, as he came to the fork in the road that old horse refused to go toward Goodland. He would go any way but toward Goodland. Father tried and tried; at last he gave him the reins and he returned home. A few days later he heard that there was an election at Goodland Church and that there were a lot of drunken Indians there, waiting for him to kill him. Those drunk Indians said that the reason they meant to kill papa was because so many Indians worshiped him and they did not want their people worshiping him instead of God. They said he had gone among them preaching, teaching and doctoring them until too many of them thought him a God. He always said it was the hand of God that forced that old horse to turn back home instead of going on. Another time the old horse refused to go on and he remembered that other time so he returned home to find me very ill and in need of a doctor. There was none nearer than twenty miles so he mounted his horse again and went after the doctor who perhaps saved my life, because my father and "Grandma Oakes" with their simple remedies did not know what to do for me. Nearly every grandmother in the country practiced midwifery. "Grandma" Oakes delivered me, and named me for herself. Papa went among the Indians when they were sick, reading the Bible to them, praying, giving them pills and chill tonic, salves etc., until some of them thought he was as good as any doctor. There were so few white people around us. They were nearly all full-blood Indians who knew nothing about tilling the soil and producing something to eat. He taught them how to farm, how to take care of their sick and taught them Christianity. If any of them died he made their coffins and buried them. I’ve seen him make many a coffin. I have known him to walk from Goodland to Goodwater, about twenty miles, just to read the Bible to old Grandma Harriet Oakes, after she went blind. He got so he could not ride a horse without pain and the roads were bad for a buggy; so he just walked miles and miles. I’ve known him to walk to Kosoma, away up above Antlers. He’d go on Friday, preach on Saturday night and Sunday, go hunting and fishing until time to preach the next Saturday and Sunday, and then return home, and walk every step of the way. I have known him to walk thirty miles on Friday, rest Saturday, preach Sunday, and return home on Monday. In his later years he always walked to the churches.

As his oldest child, I kept house after Mother died and sometimes I would be so frightened I would be nearly sick. I’d hear drunk Indians whooping and shooting and I would put out the lights, and put the little ones to bed. There was a crazy Indian who would come to our house, too. I’d feed him all he would eat, then he would go to sleep and when he would awaken he would go away. I surely was afraid of him.

Mother died when I was thirteen. The only white neighbors we had were the Goodings, a mile away and Mrs. Gooding would come over often and help me with her motherly advice. They were the only white neighbors we had for a good many years.

I had gone to Goodland to school all my life and for the last two years had been the only one in my class so, when I was about fourteen my father wrote to my mother’s half-sister who was a widow with one child, and told her that he needed her for a housekeeper and to take care of the little children because I had gone as far as I could at Goodland and he must send me away to school. I attended the Arkansas College at Batesville, and worked my way through two years. I hadn’t time to specialize in anything, because I had to work so hard. Next, I attended the Texas Presbyterian College at Milford, Texas, for two years. Then I came home and married Clarence Andrew Oakes, son of Lem W. Oakes. My husband is about 1/16 Choctaw Indian. I am all white.

I remember hearing my father preach and pray in the Choctaw language. He had to learn it because sometimes his entire congregation would be full-blood Choctaw Indians.

I remember, too, when he went to Paris, Texas, and returned with a number of lamps with reflectors behind them to hang upon the wall of the church to replace the little brass lamps that we had always had. We thought the new lamps beautiful.

The Reverend Mr. Stark was the first Superintendent of Goodland school I remember, and a Mrs. Bacon kept the first boarders there I believe. The boarding house was a two-story log house with a long sideroom at the back, which was dining room and kitchen. The boys all slept upstairs and the girls downstairs. There were about ten in all and the most of them were orphans, though some of them merely lived too far away to come to school daily.

There were stores at Goodland church ground from time to time, but never a post office until about twelve years ago. It was established when the railroad town of Goodland was abandoned and Hugo was built at the crossing of the two railroads. I guess the post office was at Goodland railroad station for about fifteen years.

When I was a child, candidates for offices used to bring camping outfits to Goodland, camp for days and make speeches until each candidate had had his say; then they would move on to some other community where people gathered to hear the speeches. Word would be sent ahead so that everybody could gather there and hear the speeches, just like a camp-meeting.

152 ii. Fauka OAKES, born Jul 1885 in Indian Territory.

153 iii. Mattie OAKES, born Aug 1887 in Indian Territory.

154 iv. Nola OAKES, born May 1889 in Indian Territory.

155 v. Nona OAKES, born May 1894 in Indian Territory.

 

89. Thomas Everidge/Ervin7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Dec 24, 1846 in Choctaw Nation Mississippi, and died Jan 1928 in Choctaw Nation, Kiomitia Co., OK. He married (1) Mary Amy BAXTER 1867. She was born Abt. 1850. He married (2) Margaret Josephine ERVIN Apr 10, 1870 in Rock Hill Church, near old Spencer Academy, OK, daughter of Calvin ERVIN and Sally GIBSON. She was born Nov 27, 1835 in Doaksville, OK near Ft. Towson, and died Mar 11, 1938 in Sopher, Choctaw Co., OK.

Notes for Thomas Everidge/Ervin OAKES:

1900 census page is very light and unable to read birth date info.

County Judge of Kiamichi County. Served in the House of Representatives.

Thomas E. Oakes

Death Claims Old Settler Yesterday

The Soper Democrat January 17, 1929 – transcribed by Ron Henson

Yesterday at noon death claimed one of the oldest citizens of Choctaw County, Judge Thos. E. Oakes. Death occurred at the family home at Atlas after an extended illness. Mr. Oakes was stricken with flu which developed into pneumonia. He recovered from the attack of pneumonia, but his age was against him and death finally relieved him of his suffering.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at Soper this afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Hodgkins, President of Oklahoma Presbyterian College at Durant, followed by interment in the Soper cemetery. At the grave the services were conducted by the Masonic fraternity, which order he had been a member for nearly fifty years. He was a charter member of Soper lodge No. 345, having originally joined at Doaksville No. 2.

Thomas Everidge Oakes was born December 24th, 1846, at Goodwater, I.T., near what is now Frogville, Choctaw County, where he lived until 1888 when he moved to the Atlas community. He was twice married, his first wife dying shortly afterwards. He was married to Miss Margaret Ervin in 1870, who survives him, and to this union 12 children were born, five of whom survive, as follows: D.W. Oakes, Soper; Thos. J. Oakes, Wichita Falls, Texas; E.O. Oakes, Soper; Mrs. Howard Morris, Soper; and Mrs. Rosa Huff, Seminole. All of the children were at his bedside during his last illness.

Four brothers and two sisters also survive. They are L.W. Oakes, G.W. Oakes, J.E. Oakes, Mrs. J.B. Jeter and Mrs. Tom Hibben.

For many years before statehood he was county judge of what was then Kiamichi county which position he held until Judge Glenn was inaugurated county judge at statehood.

Prior to his becoming county judge he was national auditor for the Choctaw nation which position he held for many years. At statehood he was chosen as county commissioner of Choctaw county which position he held for nearly five years.

Judge Oakes has been identified with most of the progressive moves of the Choctaw Nation, and stood out as a man among men. He had been a member of the Presbyterian church for 60 years and always lived up to the teachings of his church. Besides the immediate family he leaves many friends to mourn his loss.

The person who served in the capacity of head carpenter and who was directly responsible for the proper erection of the capitol was Thomas Oakes, a young man from North Carolina, who had come to the Indian Territory in the employ of the U. S. Government. He and one of his brothers had moved west during the time that main emigration of the Choctaws from Mississippi had taken place. His brother did not remain in this part of the West but went to one of the northern states where he settled and reared a family. But Thomas Oakes remained among the Choctaws and married Harriet Everidge, whose family was of Choctaw descent and prominent in the Nation. During a family reunion a few years ago at Soper, Oklahoma, the descendants of Thomas Oakes were referred to as the "Red Oakes" to distinguish them from the "White Oakes," the descendants of the brother who had settled in the North.6 Thomas and Harriet Everidge Oakes were the parents of a large family of children, among whom were the late Honorable Thomas E. Oakes, of Soper, and Lemuel Oakes, justice of the peace at Hugo, ever since statehood. Mrs. Thomas Oakes' brother, Judge Joel Everidge, was a man of high standing in his community and was well known for his integrity and trustworthiness. He was a judge of the supreme court of the Choctaw Nation for many, many years, having the distinction of serving in the capacity longer than any other citizen.

More About Thomas Everidge/Ervin OAKES:

Burial: Soper, Choctaw Co., OK

More About Thomas OAKES and Mary BAXTER:

Marriage: 1867

Notes for Margaret Josephine ERVIN:

1900 census indictaes she had 12 children with 5 living

Indian Pioneer History Project of Choctaw County

Margaret (Ervin) Oakes

Date: June 9, 1937

Date of Birth: 1854

Place of Birth: Doaksville, Indian Territory

Father: Calvin Ervin

Mother: Sally Gibson

Field Worker: Hazel B. Greene

Mrs. Margaret Oakes is the daughter of Calvin Ervin, a white man, and Sally Gibson Ervin, not quite a full-blood Choctaw Indian (also of French blood). Her parents were married in Mississippi, and, to quote her, "Emigrated to this God-forsaken country" when the other Indians were brought here about 1833 or ‘34. The father, a native of North Carolina, had taught school in Mississippi. Sally Gibson went to school to him, and when they began moving the Indians to this country, they got married and came out here with her family. He engaged in carpenter work out here, and was rebuilding Old Spencer Academy, when Mrs. Oakes got married. There were several buildings and they had been torn down by soldiers in time of the war. They had camped in them and as nearly demolished them as they could without burning them to the ground. So the father took a contract to rebuild them, and took his family up there and resided till he had the work completed. It took him a year or more. They were large two story buildings, and the rest of them were frame. "I remember," Mrs. Oakes said, "there were a lot of skeletons, bones, and skulls in one of them. We were told that that was the medical department, and these skulls, bones, etc., might have been used in classes. I knew that we children were scared to death to go near that particular building after night. I was sixteen years old, then."

Father and mother first settled a place about four miles northwest of old Doaksville. That was our home, mother died there and was buried in the garden. No tombstone was ever put over her grave.

I went to school some, to neighborhood schools; then to Pine Ridge Academy. It was not a boarding school when I went there. It had gotten broken up in time of the war.

"I remember," resumed Mrs. Oakes, "when all west and northwest of old Doaksville was a vast rolling prairie. One could see for miles. Now they tell me that that is timbered country. There were a few red clay hill around Doaksville proper."

Margaret Ervin was one of the youngest children of the family, a little past sixteen when she married Thomas E. Oakes (brother to Lem W., Joel E., and S.L. Oakes). They were married at the old Methodist church ground on Rock Creek, northwest of what is called Spencerville now. "That was where old Spencer Academy was being built by my father. A protracted meeting had been going on and at the close of it we got married and stayed up there at my father’s home about two weeks. Then we came on over here and settled at Atlas. Twelve children were born to us. Four died very young, five are living now, Mrs. Howard Morris, that is Sue; Mrs. Rosa Huff; Dan, and Ed Oakes, all of Soper, Oklahoma; Thomas of Dallas, Texas.

"My husband surely did like to dance, and we would go to dances. Finally, we had been to a dance when our second child was a baby, and we got to talking it over and decided that folks who were raising a family should settle down. So that was our last dance, we quit and both joined the Presbyterian church.

"Thomas E. Oakes lived to be 82 years old, had all of his teeth, and they were sound and he was getting his second sight (I can see better now without my glasses). As the children married off and left us, lots of folks tried to get him to break up our home out there in the country and move to town. ‘Never,’ said he, ‘till they take me feet foremost,’ and, "she continued, "that is the way he went."

"He said that he wanted to stay where he could be raising things as long as he lived. Thomas E. Oakes always tried to raise twice as much produce, garden vegetables and hogs, as his family would raise; because, he said, there were always unfortunates, who didn’t have so much and would be glad to get some of the things he raised. Sometimes they would work for foodstuffs, but if they could not work, they never left Tom Oakes’ house empty-handed. We raised just everything that was good to eat.

"In addition to our twelve children, we never turned away an orphan. We partly raised several. Then we gave our children all the education they would take. When they finished in our neighborhood schools, we sent them to colleges. The girls went to New Hope, and O.P.C. at Durant, and the boys went to Spencer, Stillwater, and Muskogee. We sent them to colleges as long as they would go, and always gave them their choice of going and finishing college or settling down and marrying. They all preferred to marry, and not finish college. We even sent some of them to Missouri and some to Sherman, just anywhere they preferred to go, because we wanted to make refined men and women of them. One daughter, Mary, who died two years after she married C.L. Harris, was especially refined. She and Sue went to Mary Conner College in Paris, Texas.

"The Oakes were usually buried at the Oakes family burial plot at Old Goodwater, but Thomas preferred to be buried at Soper. He died and was buried at Soper, in January 1928, and just in the fall before that expressed a wish to be buried at Soper. He was about one eighth Choctaw Indian.

He was County Judge of Kiamichi County, perhaps more than once.

The father of Mrs. Margaret Oakes, Calvin Ervin, was a white man from North Carolina, later from Mississippi, and he kept what he called a history of this country, of happenings here from time to time. Just written with pencil. The family would never give that up, but will permit it to be copied. It is now in the possession of Clarence Willis, at McAlester. He is now a banker there.

In Mrs. Oakes’ home is a little old home-made hickory chair, with a cowhide bottom. She said that it was made before she married, and that all her children learned to walk by that chair.

Mrs. Oakes said that Spencer Academy was moved from Spencerville to Atlas, because of the convenience of the railroad. Long years ago, supplies were shipped up Red river to Frogville, then freighted by ox wagons to Spencer, up in old Cedar County. The Buildings were not moved, only the school. It was rebuilt in 1870, and ran on there for several years. Possibly ten or twelve years, though that is printed history somewhere. This writer knows that some of the old buildings were standing in 1900, though not in use at that time.

Calvin Ervin re-married after Sally Gibson Ervin died, and moved to Hartshorne, where he died and was buried there. This writer does not know whom he married or when.

The Choctaw people were separated into clans, and Margaret Ervin was a descendent of the Hyah-Pa-Tusk-Kalo clan, through the line of her mother, Sallie Gibson Ervin.

The greater part of their married life was spent in the country near Soper. To this union twelve children were born, five of whom survive, as follows: D. W. Oakes, Soper; Thos. J. Oakes, Dallas; Edgar O. Oakes, Hugo; Mrs. Sue Morris and Mrs. Rosa Huff, Soper. Besides, she is survived by 24 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. She also reared six others by adoption.

Their home was a hospitable one; always open to every one. Any one in need of assistance received it from them. Their kindness and generosity will long be remembered. They were pioneers with the true pioneer spirit, and to know them was to love them.1 Their passing is mourned by a host of friends and relatives.

—Mrs. Thos. O. Kirby. Jericho, Texas

Mrs. Thomas E. Oakes passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Howard Morris, Soper, Oklahoma, March 11, 1938. Death was due to the infirmities of age. Funeral services were held in the Soper Methodist Church, conducted by Rev. G. C. Crowell, Presbyterian minister of Hugo. Interment was in the Soper Cemetery, by the side of her husband, who passed away January 16, 1929.

Marriage Notes for Thomas OAKES and Margaret ERVIN:

Rev. Mr. Walker, a Presbyterian minister

More About Thomas OAKES and Margaret ERVIN:

Marriage: Apr 10, 1870, Rock Hill Church, near old Spencer Academy, OK

Children of Thomas OAKES and Margaret ERVIN are:

156 i. Sue8 OAKES, born in Chocktaw Nation, Indian Territory, OK. She married Howard MORRIS.

157 ii. Rosa OAKES, born May 1899 in Chocktaw Nation, Indian Territory, OK. She married Mr. HUFF.

158 iii. Daniel W. OAKES, born Feb 26, 1874 in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, OK.

Notes for Daniel W. OAKES:

Indian Pioneer History Project of Choctaw County

Dan W. Oakes

Date: January 10, 1938

Post Office: Soper, Oklahoma

Date of Birth: February 26, 1874

Place of Birth: Born in Choctaw Nation

Father: Thomas E. Oakes

Place of Birth: Choctaw Nation

Information on father: Operated Oakes Ferry on Red River

Mother: Margaret Erwin

Place of birth: Doaksville

Information on mother: One half Choctaw

Field Worker: Lula Austin

My father held many public offices; his first public office was that of supreme clerk which he filled for six years. He was county judge and also served in the House of Representatives. He was Thomas E. Oakes.

I have a ledger which my father kept while operating the store and the Oakes ferry across Red River. This ledger was the means of saving a young man’s life. Late one evening a young man stopped at my father’s place and asked for work. Father told him that there was no work just then, but if he wanted to stay awhile maybe he could use him in a few days. The young man stayed and father put him to work doing odd things around and when this boy had earned some money he bought a shirt and some pants from Father. After this young man had been there a month, a marshal from Texas arrested him and said he was wanted for murder in Texas. The day he made the purchase from Father’s store was the day on which he was charged with having committed the murder. So by Father showed the entry in the ledger proving that the young man was in the Indian Territory on that day and he was cleared of the murder charge.

I attended school at Spencer Academy and Clarksville Tennessee. There were about one hundred boys at Spencer Academy while I was there and we thrived on corn bread, beans and potatoes. I still use my grandmother’s oval shaped iron Tom Fuller pot which is a hundred and three years old and was brought here from Mississippi I also have the old wooden lock and key used by my father to lock the store at Oakes ferry.

159 iv. Edward OAKES, born in Chocktaw Nation, Indian Territory, OK.

+ 160 v. Thomas Jefferson OAKES, born Jul 31, 1880 in Hugo, Choctaw Co., OK.

 

90. Joel E.7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 15, 1858 in Indian Territory, OK, and died Dec 07, 1937. He married Josephine E. (maiden name ?) OAKES. She was born Sep 18, 1861 in MI, and died Apr 30, 1932.

Notes for Joel E. OAKES:

1900 Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory

J. E. 41

Josephine (listed on separate page

Virgia 19

Lizzie 17

Bert 15

Ellie 12

Sarah E. 10

Cora (Oakes) Law 20

Elizabeth E. Oakes (boarder) 55

More About Joel E. OAKES:

Burial: Choctaw County, OK - Mt. Olivet Cemetery

More About Josephine E. (maiden name ?) OAKES:

Burial: Choctaw County, OK - Mt. Olivet Cemetery

Children of Joel OAKES and Josephine OAKES are:

161 i. Virgia8 OAKES, born Jan 1881 in Indian Territory.

162 ii. Lizzie OAKES, born Feb 1883 in Indian Territory.

163 iii. Bert OAKES, born Dec 1884 in Indian Territory.

164 iv. Ellie OAKES, born Apr 1888 in Indian Territory.

165 v. Sarah E. OAKES, born Sep 1889 in Indian Territory.

166 vi. Cora OAKES, born Apr 1879 in Indian Territory. She married husband LAW.

 

91. George Washington7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jul 1861 in Indian Territory, OK. He married A. G. (maiden name ?) OAKES. She was born May 1865 in Indian Territory.

Notes for A. G. (maiden name ?) OAKES:

1900 census, she indicates she had 10 children with only 3 living

Children of George OAKES and A. OAKES are:

+ 167 i. David Folsom8 OAKES, born Jan 1883 in Indian Territory.

168 ii. Zoe OAKES, born Aug 1884 in Indian Territory.

169 iii. Pearl OAKES, born Jun 1888 in Indian Territory.

 

92. Charles Dosenburg7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Apr 15, 1841 in Ervin, Indian Territory, OK, and died Jan 14, 1925 in Ervin, Indian Territory, OK. He married Margaret Ann BUCHANAN Mar 21, 1899. She was born Mar 21, 1867 in Middle, TN, and died Aug 05, 1947 in Hugo, OK.

Notes for Charles Dosenburg OAKES:

1900 Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory

C. D. 41

Margaret 33

Mary Ellen Phillips 15 dau ??

William Newton Oakes 10

Henry Franklin Oakes 7

Savanah F. Oakes 5

Laura Belle Oakes 3

More About Charles OAKES and Margaret BUCHANAN:

Marriage: Mar 21, 1899

Children of Charles OAKES and Margaret BUCHANAN are:

+ 170 i. Henry Franklin8 OAKES, born Dec 31, 1892 in Ervin, Indian Territory.OK; died Jun 24, 1965.

171 ii. William Newton OAKES, born May 1890 in Indian Territory.

172 iii. Savanah F. OAKES, born Aug 1894 in Indian Territory.

173 iv. Laura Belle OAKES, born Jan 1897 in Indian Territory.

 

94. Samuel Lorenzo7 OAKES (Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Dec 1853 in Indian Territory, OK. Samuel married Cleora G. GRANT. She was born Aug 1873 in Indian Territory.

Child of Samuel OAKES and Cleora GRANT is:

174 i. Tommie Oflelia/Ophelia8 OAKES, born 1920 in Shoals, Choctaw Nation, Oklahoma; died Feb 01, 1945.

 

97. James W.7 OAKES (George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Mar 1850 in Cedar Co., MO, and died Aft. 1930 in Grove, OK. He married Synthy Frances (Fannie) BUSTER Feb 13, 1876 in Cedar Co., MO. She was born Jan 04, 1847 in Macon Co., MO.

Notes for James W. OAKES:

James is said to have kept a store in Oklahoma, probably in or near Grove.

More About James OAKES and Synthy BUSTER:

Marriage: Feb 13, 1876, Cedar Co., MO

Children of James OAKES and Synthy BUSTER are:

+ 175 i. George8 OAKES, born Jun 15, 1888 in Stockton, MO; died Aug 02, 1958 in Kingwood Twp, Hunterdon Co., NJ.

176 ii. Nora OAKES, born Dec 30, 1878 in Cedar Co., MO. She married Walter JACOBS; born Dec 15, 1882.

177 iii. Charles (Charley) OAKES, born Jan 16, 1880 in Cedar Co., MO; died Jun 08, 1887 in Cedar Co., MO.

More About Charles (Charley) OAKES:

Burial: Cedar Co., MO - Hackleman Cemetery

178 iv. James W. OAKES, born Oct 21, 1882 in Cedar Co., MO; died Jun 15, 1966 in Afton/Ottowa, OK. He married Annie (maiden name ?) OAKES; born Abt. 1877 in OK.

 

98. Robert Marion7 OAKES (George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Nov 1834 in VA. He married Matilda Catherine SNODGRASS. She was born Oct 29, 1835 in MO.

Children of Robert OAKES and Matilda SNODGRASS are:

179 i. Sarah Caroline8 OAKES, born Abt. 1858 in MO.

180 ii. Nancy Ellen OAKES, born Abt. 1859 in MO.

181 iii. Salina M. OAKES, born Abt. 1861 in MO.

182 iv. George Thomas OAKES, born Abt. 1863 in MO.

183 v. Andrew Jackson OAKES, born Abt. 1865 in MO.

184 vi. William E. OAKES, born Abt. 1868 in MO.

185 vii. Martha (Corey) OAKES, born Feb 1872 in MO.

186 viii. Marion Augustus OAKES, born Abt. 1874 in MO.

187 ix. Mary Jane (Minni J. ) OAKES, born Abt. 1879 in MO.

 

100. Thomas W.7 OAKES (George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1838 in TN, and died Abt. 1867 in Cedar Co., MO. He married Hester Ann LIGHT Oct 20, 1861 in Cedar Co., MO. She was born Abt. 1841 in KY.

More About Thomas OAKES and Hester LIGHT:

Marriage: Oct 20, 1861, Cedar Co., MO

Child of Thomas OAKES and Hester LIGHT is:

+ 188 i. Thomas R.8 OAKES, born Mar 1863.

 

107. Lemuel R.7 OAKES (George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 1861 in Cedar Co., MO. He married Mary WRIGHT Aug 29, 1893 in Cedar Co., MO. She was born Nov 1872 in MO.

More About Lemuel OAKES and Mary WRIGHT:

Marriage: Aug 29, 1893, Cedar Co., MO

Children of Lemuel OAKES and Mary WRIGHT are:

189 i. Harley8 OAKES, born Nov 1894 in MO.

190 ii. Harry OAKES, born Mar 1896 in MO.

191 iii. Clara OAKES, born May 1898 in MO.

192 iv. Luan OAKES, born Jun 1884 in MO.

Notes for Luan OAKES:

Foster daughter

 

114. David N.7 OAKES (John Elliott6, Anthony5, Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1858. He married Ella Green MOOREFIELD.

Children of David OAKES and Ella MOOREFIELD are:

193 i. Henry Nelson8 OAKES, born Apr 12, 1885.

194 ii. John R. OAKES, born Abt. 1886.

195 iii. Joseph Green OAKES, born Abt. 1887.

196 iv. Matthew Thomas OAKES, born Abt. 1891.

197 v. Major David OAKES, born Aug 26, 1893.

198 vi. Rosa Keeling OAKES, born Aug 28, 1894.

199 vii. Sallie Myrtle OAKES, born Abt. 1897.

200 viii. Winston Horatio OAKES, born Abt. 1898.

201 ix. Edward Winkleton OAKES, born May 30, 1899.

202 x. Nathaniel Thomas OAKES, born Aug 16, 1901.

203 xi. Maude Amanda OAKES, born Abt. 1903.

204 xii. Verna Ann OAKES, born May 25, 1904.

205 xiii. Buck Bue OAKES.

 

117. John Wesley7 OAKES (William6, John5, Daniel4, William3, John2, John1) was born Abt. 1858. He married Mary Elnora CASTOR.

Children of John OAKES and Mary CASTOR are:

206 i. Emzy Farmer8 OAKES, Sr., born Abt. 1893.

207 ii. William G. OAKES, born Abt. 1881.

208 iii. Charles LeRoy OAKES, born Abt. 1884.

209 iv. Anna M. OAKES, born Abt. 1890.

210 v. Helena R. OAKES, born Abt. 1897.

 

Generation No. 8

144. William Thomas8 HIBBEN (Mary Ann Hester7 OAKES, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Mar 11, 1894 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr., and died Jul 20, 1973 in Hughes Co., OK. He married Lillie Mae CANNON. She was born Jan 25, 1896, and died Oct 29, 1968 in Hughes Co., OK.

Notes for William Thomas HIBBEN:

Hughes County, OK, Glory/Bilbee Cemetery

HIBBEN

HIBBEN

Lillie M. William T.

Jan 25, 1896 Mar 11, 1894

Oct 29, 1968 July 20, 1973

More About William Thomas HIBBEN:

Burial: Hughes County, OK, Glory/Bilbee Cemetery

More About Lillie Mae CANNON:

Burial: Hughes County, OK, Glory/Bilbee Cemetery

Children of William HIBBEN and Lillie CANNON are:

211 i. Fay Imogene9 HIBBEN, born 1918; died 1981.

212 ii. William Theodore HIBBEN, born 1920; died 1976. He married Eloise Festus ROBERTS.

 

147. George Wellington8 HIBBEN (Mary Ann Hester7 OAKES, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Nov 03, 1899 in Frogvill, Kiamichi Co., OK Indian Terr., and died Feb 25, 1992 in Longview, TX. He married Golden WATTS. She was born Mar 04, 1908, and died Dec 04, 1993.

More About George Wellington HIBBEN:

Burial: Shoals Cem

More About Golden WATTS:

Burial: Shoals Cem

Children of George HIBBEN and Golden WATTS are:

+ 213 i. Kenneth Gordon9 HIBBEN, Sr., born Oct 13, 1927; died Dec 06, 1999.

214 ii. Thomas Solomon HIBBEN, born Nov 24, 1938; died Mar 04, 1939.

More About Thomas Solomon HIBBEN:

Burial: Shoals Cem

 

160. Thomas Jefferson8 OAKES (Thomas Everidge/Ervin7, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jul 31, 1880 in Hugo, Choctaw Co., OK. He married (1) Sue K. MORRIS 1903 in Hugo, OK. She was born Jun 28, 1882 in Hugo, Choctaw Co., OK. He married (2) Ella (Maiden name ?) OAKES Abt. 1906 in OK. She was born 1880 in TX.

Notes for Thomas Jefferson OAKES:

1900 Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory

Thomas

Sue

Rosa

Edgar

(Special inquiries rlating to Indians - stating they are Choctaw)

1910 Hugo, Choctaw Co., OK

More About Thomas OAKES and Sue MORRIS:

Marriage: 1903, Hugo, OK

More About Thomas OAKES and Ella OAKES:

Marriage: Abt. 1906, OK

Children of Thomas OAKES and Sue MORRIS are:

215 i. Rosa9 OAKES.

216 ii. Edgar OAKES.

Child of Thomas OAKES and Ella OAKES is:

217 i. Pate9 OAKES, born Abt. 1907 in TX.

 

167. David Folsom8 OAKES (George Washington7, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jan 1883 in Indian Territory.

Child of David Folsom OAKES is:

218 i. Nina Marie9 OAKES.

 

170. Henry Franklin8 OAKES (Charles Dosenburg7, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Dec 31, 1892 in Ervin, Indian Territory.OK, and died Jun 24, 1965. He married Ella Louise RICHARDS Jul 03, 1910 in Pine Bluff, TX. She was born Oct 02, 1896 in Puxico, Missouri, and died Apr 21, 1991.

More About Henry Franklin OAKES:

Burial: Choctaw County, OK - Shoat Springs Cem

More About Ella Louise RICHARDS:

Burial: Choctaw Co., OK - Shoat Springs Cem

More About Henry OAKES and Ella RICHARDS:

Marriage: Jul 03, 1910, Pine Bluff, TX

Child of Henry OAKES and Ella RICHARDS is:

219 i. Corrine9 OAKES, born Jun 26, 1913 in Ervin, Oklahoma.

 

175. George8 OAKES (James W.7, George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Jun 15, 1888 in Stockton, MO, and died Aug 02, 1958 in Kingwood Twp, Hunterdon Co., NJ. He married Kittie LANHAM Abt. 1919. She was born Jul 16, 1894 in Grayson Co., TX.

Notes for George OAKES:

Arlington National Cemetery

Birthplace Stockton, Cedar Co, MO.

Probably living in Grove, Delaware Co, OK after 1910, that is where he and Kitty met.

World War I Draft Card shows:

738.46 12-6-30-A

George Oakes 29 tall medium

405 S. Fourth St. Springfield, Ill. eyes brown, hair black, not bald [yet]

June 15th, 1888

Natural Born

Stocktown, Mo. U.S.A.

Clerk in Abstract Office Lew A. Hessler (?)

Abstract & Title Co. of Sangamon Co. County Clerk, Lake Co. Ill.

Springfield, Illinois [Cy CPa Sinatra??] deputy

no dependents

Single White

(Military Service) Student, R.O.T.C., Co. 8 Illinois, Ft. Sheridan, Ill

(exemption) No New address 10/11/17

205 North 9th St. Re(gister?) Ark

George Oakes Grove, Okla.

Centralia, Craig Co, OK by 1920, when George Jr. was born.

Holdenville, Hughes Co, OK in 1925, letter.

Muskogee OK abt 1926, George Jr. at Longfellow School for one year

Stillwater,OK, abt 1927-1933 George Jr. at Jefferson and then Stillwater Junior High, 3 & 2 years

Lincoln or Cane Hill, AR abt 1933-1937..., George Jr. at Lincoln HS for three years.

20 Seventh Street, S.E. Washington, D. C. when they first moved to Washington, then

1634 D St. NE Washington DC, abt 1942-1958 (until he retired)

From family stories:

He served in the Army during the First World War, and injured his back by falling on some stairs in a farmhouse in France where his unit was staying. He also developed a fear of airplanes because he saw the primitive models that were used in the War.

He was a court clerk in Oklahoma, and an outstanding typist. He studied law for a while but had to quit because his sponsors wanted him to help them cheat the Indians out of their property and he refused.

Later, he sold insurance. The founder of Tyson Foods may have been one of his customers in Arkansas.

During the Second World War he moved to Washington, D.C. and worked for the government until he retired around 1958. Then they moved to St. Petersburg, Florida.

More About George OAKES and Kittie LANHAM:

Marriage: Abt. 1919

Children of George OAKES and Kittie LANHAM are:

220 i. George9 OAKES, Jr, born Jun 24, 1920 in Centralia, Craig Co., OK; died Feb 09, 1995 in Shelby, Cleveland Co., NC. He married Hallie Jane BRUNSON May 16, 1945 in Cocoa, FL; born Oct 22, 1918 in Rockledge, Brevard Co., FL.

Notes for George OAKES, Jr:

Notice of Separation from the U.S. Naval Service. Oakes, George Jr., permanent address 1634 D. St. N.E. Washington, D.C. Living at 311 W. Spring St. Fayetteville, Ark when he entered service on 29 Dec 1941 (at Little Rock, Ark.). Attended Av. Mechanics school for 40 Wks at Chicago,(Great Lakes) Ill., served 10 Mos as Aviation Machinist Mate 2c, the 15 1/2 Mos as Aviation Machinist Mate 1c at NAGS, Jacksonville, Fla., FltSerSch, Va. Beach, Va. - HEDRON, FAW 11 - NavTraCen, Chgo, Ill. Discharged at USN Personnel Separation Center, Bainbridge, Md. on 15 Sept 1945. He had 1 year of overseas/sea service, which was mostly at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Before the war he was working for Robert E. White in Fayetteville, Ark. as a Short Order Cook. When he heard about Pearl Harbor he went to join the Army, hoping for the Air Corps -- the Army recruiter was out to lunch so the Navy recruiter talked to him first.

After the war, he took flight instruction from a former WAF. He worked at a small airport in Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C. He then worked at an airport in the Norfolk, Virginia area.

He became a flight engineer for Eastern Air Lines about 1951.

EASTERN AIR LINES, INC., IN FLIGHT FEATHERING REPORT [copy of form, CAPTAIN John M. Sanford, PILOT, E.D. Swinden, FLT. ENGINEER, G. Oakes -- explanation on reverse]

#2 engine had given trouble on our trip from IDL, which was indicated by high oil consumption, and a very slight roughness accompanied by BMEP fluctuation. These were intermittent and of vey short duration, and happened infrequently. 20 gallons of oil were added at HOU and the Captain wanted the oil leak located and repaired if possible. This involved a rather lengthy dela and it was suggested that we take a substitute airplane. This was done, but we experienced engine trouble and returned to HOU. By this time HOU maintenance had checked this engine by a thorough cleaning, tightening the various units that often leak slightly and had run up the engine. No external oil leaks were found and the engine functioned normally at the 30" check. It was decided that the leakage was normal high oil consumption due to high flight time on that engine, which had 937 hours. This was also the opiniion of MIA maintenance and since the hourly oil consumption was within limits specified by the maintenance manual, the aircraft was accepted for the rest of the flight. All readings were normal during take-off, METO and climb but after 27 minutes of cruise #2 engine dropped 30 BMEP, the pilot reported engine roughness and loss of power indicated by aircraft yaw. The Engineer reported to the Captain and when the two of them turned to observe the instruments, the koil pressure warning light came on. The engine was immediately feathered. After feathering and before the engine out check list could be read the Captain observed the glow of a large fire from the outboard sid of #2 engine. The firewall shutoff valve was closed, the cowl flaps were opened for maximum air blast to blow out a zone 1 fire, and since we had had no fire warning bell or light and could not be definetely be sure fire was zone 1, the fire extinguishing system was used for zone 2. Emergency landing was made at Gary Air Force Base at San Marcos, Tex. Fire was apparently out upon landing.

More About George OAKES and Hallie BRUNSON:

Marriage: May 16, 1945, Cocoa, FL

221 ii. James Lanham OAKES, born May 20, 1922 in OK; died May 1981 in Fairfax, VA. He married wife BOHANNON.

 

188. Thomas R.8 OAKES (Thomas W.7, George William6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Mar 1863. He married (1) Idelia BURT Jun 20, 1889 in Cedar Co., MO. She was born Jan 25, 1867 in IN. He married (2) Sarena TERRELL Nov 19, 1910 in Cedar Co., MO.

Notes for Thomas R. OAKES:

THOMAS R.8 OAKES (THOMAS W.7, GEORGE WILLIAM6, LEMUEL5, WILLIAM H.4, WILLIAM3, JOHN2, JOHN1) was born Abt. 1863. He married (1) IDELIA BURT June 20, 1889 in Cedar County, Missouri, daughter of SAM BURT and MARY ?. She was born Abt. 1867, and died Abt. 1909. He married (2) SARENA TERRELL November 19, 1910 in Cedar County, Missouri.

Notes for THOMAS R. OAKES:

In the 1870 Cedar County, Missouri census "Thomas R." is 7 and born in Missouri. He is listed under George W. but it is likely that he was their grandson vs. the child of George W. and Caroline S.. Elaine Oakes has him as the child of Thomas W.. *** In the 1900 Cedar County, Missouri census Thomas R. is 37, born March 1863, lives in the Washington township and is married. [Bob Oakes] *** In the 1910 Cedar County, Missouri census Thomas R. is 45, born in Missouri and a widow. His in-laws are living with him and his son. [Bob Oakes]

Marriage Notes for THOMAS OAKES and IDELIA BURT:

Book E, page 139 (or 639); both from Caplinger Mills. [Bob Oakes]

More About Thomas OAKES and Idelia BURT:

Marriage: Jun 20, 1889, Cedar Co., MO

More About Thomas OAKES and Sarena TERRELL:

Marriage: Nov 19, 1910, Cedar Co., MO

Child of Thomas OAKES and Idelia BURT is:

222 i. Fred R.9 OAKES, born May 1893 in Cedar Co., MO; died 1963 in Cedar Co., MO. He married (1) Lenora E. FIRESTONE Dec 15, 1914 in Cedar Co., MO; born Abt. 1890. He married (2) Alva May MOYER May 14, 1921 in Cedar Co., MO; born Abt. 1895.

Notes for Fred R. OAKES:

He played the violin (fiddle), as I recall, and I remember he grew some peanuts at one time. He was an auto mechanic and once operated a gas station (in Nevada, Mo., I think), where the story was that he was once held up at gunpoint by the notorious robber, "Pretty Boy" Floyd. Fred and Alva were always pretty poor, but good people. Bill Moyer

More About Fred R. OAKES:

Burial: Cedar Co, MO - Caplinger Mills Cemetery

More About Fred OAKES and Lenora FIRESTONE:

Marriage: Dec 15, 1914, Cedar Co., MO

More About Fred OAKES and Alva MOYER:

Marriage: May 14, 1921, Cedar Co., MO

 

Generation No. 9

213. Kenneth Gordon9 HIBBEN, Sr. (George Wellington8, Mary Ann Hester7 OAKES, Thomas Wilson6, Lemuel5, William H.4, William3, John2, John1) was born Oct 13, 1927, and died Dec 06, 1999. He married Jan (maiden name ?) HIBBEN. She was born Jan 27, 1930.

More About Kenneth Gordon HIBBEN, Sr.:

Burial: Shoals Cem

Website last updated Saturday October 31, 2009